aligning our personal objectives with our national ones


THE other day I said, on radio (KFM – where I am invited on Tuesdays to join a panel of serious people), that I was disappointed in a number of “educated and otherwise informed people” because of their reaction to the announcement around the President’s End-of-Year Address.

It was reported that the Uganda Communications Commission had issued guidelines (instructions?) that private media stations would have to air the address live, which caused a social media furore – not that there is any other kind these days in Uganda.

Coming from some quarters, we shouldn’t be surprised by an uproar or flurry of angry messages whenever anything about our political leadership is mentioned – much like most countries face around the world (Google ‘United States of America’).

But in others I had to check whether I was reading the comparison wrong or not.

See, in most “corporate” (which word could in the past easily refer to an entire State) organisations the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) communicates the objectives and goals of the organisation, on behalf of the Board, which in most cases represents the shareholders (citizens, nationals, etc).

In the corporate world the CEO might likely address staff every month or every quarter, depending on how big or busy the corporation might be, which event is a ‘Stop-Everything-And-Pay-Attention’ affair.

It has to be.

This is the one person at whose desk “the buck stops” because this is the person entrusted with leading the management of the affairs of the entire organisation. This person chooses a team to assist him or her to run the organisation; provides guidance and leadership to that team; secures or mobilises resources from the shareholders and investors; then leads the motivation of the workers so they turn their human capital and other factors into value for the shareholders.

Many years ago, I was told by two notably successful Asian-Ugandan businessmen that their fathers had taught them to always pay attention to speeches made by politicians – starting with the President – and daily news reports. The information they gleaned from those two sources, they explained separately, was their core business intelligence.

One of them told me his father had been raised with this knowledge and their family wealth had therefore weathered the Idi Amin Asian expulsion of the 1970s. Many years after I first heard these statements from them I attended an event launch at which one of them was unveiling a massive new investment and on the sidelines he revealed what had shown him that possibility.

“Every time the President makes a speech, I listen for clues…”

Exactly as happens whenever a CEO speaks – shareholders, investors, employees, business partners, suppliers, and other key stakeholders…they all stop and listen.

Especially at crucial points of the business cycle – at the end and start of the financial year, hence the State of the Nation address taking place just before the Budget speech; at the close of the calendar year; and when major business changes are taking place.

Reading the second tier newspaper across the border in Kenya a couple of weeks ago, I caught the headline, “Uhuru bets on four key sectors to boost growth’. The story outlined the “four pillars” the CEO of Kenya is focusing on: ‘Food Security, Affordable Housing, Manufacturing and Affordable Healthcare’.

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Stop right now and ask the next ten people you meet whether they can recite Uganda’s strategic priorities – it might be as frustrating as asking fifty people whether or not they know what our National Development Plan (II – not the first one) is.

Mind you, the idea here is not that we should have kept quiet and taken in everything said by the CEO without criticism and analysis, but maybe, just maybe, criticise and analyse after listening?

He spoke about many things: More sophisticated crime detection methods; illegal fishing; local content (Buy Uganda, Build Uganda); improved lake management; irrigation; innovations in solar power usage; import substitution (we annually import finished products worth US$7billion); the need for value addition to our raw materials within Uganda before exporting; more support for scientists; artisanship parks being built in Kampala…

The list is long and it contains many hints as to where the government will be placing its priorities next year – which should direct where the rest of us should place ours so we all push in the same direction and achieve “A Transformed Ugandan Society from a Peasant to a Modern and Prosperous Country within 30 years” – Uganda Vision 2040 as stated in the National Development Plan II.

In the corporate world, after the CEO has made those speeches and presentations, laying out the plans or strategies, the rest of the leadership translates these plans or strategies into departmental and personal plans and strategies so that over the year all staff focus on achieving the central goals and objectives.

After the speech over the weekend, though, do we remember what Uganda’s – OUR – goals and objectives for 2018 are; what the government that is running OUR affairs intends to do this year?

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