theme our independence ‘buy uganda, build uganda’ so that it gets real


THIS week I received a generic invitation card by social media, inviting “All Ugandans” to the 2019 Independence Day celebrations, scheduled to take place in Sironko District.

I was impressed that the announcement, or invitation, had come so early. See, about three weeks ago I was remarking to a government official how ill-prepared the general public normally is for this predictably annual celebration.

My point, also predictably annual, was that the ordinary person on the street certainly appreciated the holiday that falls on October 9 every year in commemoration of Uganda being declared free of British control, but rarely spends time focused on that fact.

Besides Government officials and hard-set nationalists, there are many people in our towns and villages who spend the day watching the national celebrations on television and showing national colours in one way or another.

Reading the invitation card made me think of all these people – the combination of the ones who care a little about the reason for the day, and the ones that don’t.

The yellow card, in national colours and a Crested Crane, carried an image of President Yoweri Museveni in one of his signature shirts and the main hat, and that of the lady MP whose district is hosting the celebrations – Hon. Florence Nambozo – in a busuuti.

The one thing that stood out for me was what the card didn’t have – the theme of this year’s Independence Day celebrations.

That made me happy – not in the mistaken belief that there might not be a theme this year, but at the opportunity right before us.

If the theme of this year’s Independence Day celebrations has not yet been selected then let’s choose one along the lines of ‘Buy Uganda, Build Uganda’!

That would be the perfect way to underscore our Independence – along the lines of Mahatma Gandhi’s Swaraj movement! When he launched his campaign it began with events where the patriotic Indians set fire to British cloth and took up Indian garments (the dhoti and shawl he is most famously pictured in) – woven off a locally-manufactured machine.

On that day, or during Independence week, or perhaps the entire month of October, we should stick to this one theme that bolsters our Independence from imperialism of all sorts – ‘Buying Ugandan to Build Uganda’.

Sironko should feature local Sironkian dishes, prepared only using Ugandan ingredients. But an allowance should be made, of course, for dishes from other parts of the country to be brought in as well.

Dishes, by the way, include the snacks and refreshments the thousands of guests could buy en route to the celebration venue – things like gonja, matooke and cassava crisps, and roasted groundnuts with sim-sim, and sim-sim balls and so on and so forth till we get to nseenene.

I don’t even need to talk about how many Rolexes could be fried up between where you are and Sironko.

Dress code? Ugandan; which isn’t just traditional dress but allows those who wish to wear cotton and linen shirts, suits or frocks to ensure they are made out of Ugandan fabric.

It is apt that Sironko’s Hon. Nambozo is wearing a busuuti – though the material is imported – on the invitation card, and President Museveni’s shirt is made in Uganda from Ugandan cotton.

The decor at the venue itself? Forget rubber balloons and bunting imported from Asia – we have hundreds of bright young and creative people here who can create the stuff that we need to brighten the place up. And the money they would earn would certainly contribute to making them “Independent!”

The list of opportunities could go on and on and on. And it’s only important and useful if we can make a decision now and act upon it.

And we shouldn’t be acting upon it just so people can make money selling stuff on the day. This is the kind of national activity that could spur more industry within people and the economy.

If every national event followed this one simple rule, imagine how much personal investment would go into taking advantage of it?

And you know one other characteristic of the day that could be improved upon? Every government department that chooses to place a newspaper advert congratulating the government on 57 years of independence should be required to list the BUBU initiatives they are running.

If they have none then let’s have them list how and where they are spend taxpayer’s money procuring stuff made or grown in Uganda.

As they congratulate us through our leaders, this message will resonate much stronger in promoting this sacred theme represented by the catchphrase “Buy Uganda, Build Uganda”.

I believe this For God and My Country!

here are some of the opportunities that were in this year’s State of the Nation address #EconomicsUG


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Photo from http://www.dispatch.ug

OVER the years, I’ve picked up this highly useful fact from various successful Asian and Asian-Ugandan businessmen operating happily in Uganda: EVERY time there is a political or national event, they pay close attention to what the speech-makers are saying.

When it’s the President, they pay extra-special heed to the details of what he says and they thereafter follow up by making additional inquiries and investigations with the relevant offices.

One of them told me this as he was explaining why his father had invested in the first level of successful industry back in 1988, after two years of closely following this new NRM/A government all the way from London, in the United Kingdom. The young man himself was showing me round an investment project of his own that had built on his father’s success but fed off the plans the government kept announcing and dropping hints at.

That’s why, after last year’s End of Year address by the President to the Republic of Uganda, I wrote this – https://skaheru.com/2018/01/06/aligning-our-personal-objectives-with-our-national-ones/.

This week we listened to President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni delivering another State of the Nation address – Uganda’s Chief Executive Officer’s report to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders.

I listened carefully to the event, paying attention to possible opportunities that even the smallest-scale businessman, entrepreneur or speculator could take advantage of and plan for.

They stand out quite well – paragraph by paragraph – #OpportunityUG – and just in case you haven’t read it or seen them, here are the ones I suspect might be useful:

“…we now have tarmac roads to almost all the corners of Uganda: Nimule; Oraba; Musingo; Vurra; Lwakhakha soon; Malaba; Busia; Busuunga, beyond Bundibugyo; Mpondwe; Mutukula; Muroongo on the Kagyera river; Mirama hill; Katuna; Cyanika and Bunagana.  Radiating from Kampala, tarmac roads are now connecting all those points. The distance between Cyanika and Oraba is 1,048Kms (655miles), all of it connected by a tarmac road, from Kisoro district to Koboko…”

When a road is built with tarmac, the value of the land adjacent and in the towns that it connects tends to rise. If you check for the most recently built road you might find some land available either for sale or lease and snatch it up before its value rises.

Besides that, there are additional opportunities along such roads – such as establishing rest-stops, motels, shopping centres, fuel stations, and other enterprises that will take advantage of the increased traffic.

“farmers will use more irrigation. In the coming financial year, the Government will work on the following irrigation schemes using the government budget:

  • Doho phase II in Butalejja district;
  • Mubuku phase II in Kasese district;
  • Wadelai in Nebbi district;
  • Tochi in Oyam district;
  • Ngenge in Oyam district;
  • Atari (Bulambuli and Kween);
  • Katete in Kanungu district;
  • Kawumu in Luwero district;
  • Amagoro (Tororo district);
  • Nabigaga (Kamuli district);
  • Rwimi (Kasese and Kabarole district);
  • Nyimur (Lamwo);
  • Musamya (Kayunga);
  • Kibimba (Gomba);
  • Kabuyanda (Isingiro);
  • Matanda (Isingiro); and
  • Igogero-Naigombwa (Iganga and Bugiri).

In order to roll-out a global irrigation system for the whole country, we are encouraging industrialists to set up assembly or manufacturing plants for solar-powered water pumps. Some of these pumps and water conveyance systems, will be used in government funded irrigation schemes. Others, however, will be used by the farmers at their own cost. I encourage all the capable farmers to, at their own cost, go  into irrigation.

We shouldn’t need the President himself to “encourage capable farmers” to go into irrigation. If you were planning to go into farming or agriculture, go and check where these irrigation projects are and set up your own project right there. Check what the application processes are and go for those!

But besides the irrigation project itself, check what elements go into the irrigation and solar-powered water pump manufacturing and see if you can supply or manufacture one of those components.

At the very least, if you don’t plan to invest, go and find a quick course to do in irrigation and solar-powered systems so that when these factories set up here you are marginally more marketable than the person next to you.

“With the building of our phosphate fertilizer plant in Tororo, Uganda, which at 2.5kgs per hectare has one of the lowest rates of fertilizer use, will now stir itself up to use more fertilizers. We are looking for an additional investor to blend the phosphates with nitrogen and potassium in order to formulate NPK (Nitrogen, phosphates and potassium). With the use of NPK, production will go up by 30%.  With higher rates of agricultural growth, the overall rate of growth will go up.”

Fertilisers are going to be taken seriously next year? First of all, the factory in question is in Tororo – what will the logistics be like? Normally transport goes from Tororo to Kampala and then from there to the rest of the country – so how about investing in a route that goes from Tororo direct to Gulu via Lira and capturing all the farmers that side?

Also, there must be an opportunity in this fertiliser trade that you can explore by even studying mixes and becoming an expert or consultant in its application and use – therefore turning all the farmers seeking fertilisers into your direct clients while also taking on the Fertiliser Plant itself.

I would like to single-out the sector of construction.  This grew by 12.5% annually. This is not surprising given the respective efforts of the government and the private sector in the areas of road and houses construction.”

The construction sector is growing by 12.5% annually? What will happen this coming year? Can we go for something there as well? Even if it’s not investing in hardware, is there a component that we can replace with something cheaper and yet equally efficient? What about the real estate brokers dealing in this growing sector – can we find better methods and corner the market?

The opportunities in construction are myriad, as it were, mushrooming each day the way apartment blocks do. Think of gardening and landscaping, and interior decoration, and auxiliary products and services.

If you have no investment capital to set up something big, how about teaming up with some pals and forming a cleaning service targeting just one set of these apartment blocks that keep cropping up…? That list goes on and on and on.

“I told you how rich Ugandans and other Africans are, already. In the case of Uganda, we spend about US dollars 7 billion a year in terms of imports. Importing what? Importing the shoes, clothes, carpets, textiles, furniture units, pharmaceuticals, electronic equipments, perfumes, soaps, wines, cars, pikipikis (motorcycles), etc etc…

We import so much? How about finding some of these items and their value, then picking up local ones and improving their quality even post-manufacture and then doing some import replacement?

That might now work for the perfumes, but even nonsense like second-hand clothing could provide an opportunity. A t-shirt with the Macdonalds logo on it could be spruced up with some kitenge bits to replace Maconalds and go for a neat margin well over and above the opened-bale price.

4,525 girls have already been assisted to engage in: knitting, shoe-making, weaving, tailoring, bakery and embroidery, while 6 groups have been assisted in furniture-making and 10 in welding.

Great opportunity there! Where are all these girls? Are they employed somewhere and each running their own business? If not, how about getting the list of the very best of them and investing in an outfit that will employ their services, skills and talents?

A handful of these girls could actually implement that little idea above of getting second-hand t-shirts and refitting them so they are fresh, Ugandan designs.

They even studied baking? If you take the marketing component and find a friend to handle packaging, you can be rolling in sweet money within a very short time of embarking on a project with these girls!

In the coming days, the Minister of Finance will announce the financial support we intend to give to the groups that wish to join the manufacturing in the form of the enhanced micro-finance efforts and the Innovation in addition to the Women Fund, the Youth Fund and Operation Wealth Creation Fund.

The ‘coming days’ that H.E. the President was referring to is the June 14 Reading of the National Budget.

If you don’t pay attention as THAT is being presented, and only focus on political statements (by yourself as well as by the politicians) please don’t blame anyone for your despondency thereafter.

aligning our personal objectives with our national ones


THE other day I said, on radio (KFM – where I am invited on Tuesdays to join a panel of serious people), that I was disappointed in a number of “educated and otherwise informed people” because of their reaction to the announcement around the President’s End-of-Year Address.

It was reported that the Uganda Communications Commission had issued guidelines (instructions?) that private media stations would have to air the address live, which caused a social media furore – not that there is any other kind these days in Uganda.

Coming from some quarters, we shouldn’t be surprised by an uproar or flurry of angry messages whenever anything about our political leadership is mentioned – much like most countries face around the world (Google ‘United States of America’).

But in others I had to check whether I was reading the comparison wrong or not.

See, in most “corporate” (which word could in the past easily refer to an entire State) organisations the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) communicates the objectives and goals of the organisation, on behalf of the Board, which in most cases represents the shareholders (citizens, nationals, etc).

In the corporate world the CEO might likely address staff every month or every quarter, depending on how big or busy the corporation might be, which event is a ‘Stop-Everything-And-Pay-Attention’ affair.

It has to be.

This is the one person at whose desk “the buck stops” because this is the person entrusted with leading the management of the affairs of the entire organisation. This person chooses a team to assist him or her to run the organisation; provides guidance and leadership to that team; secures or mobilises resources from the shareholders and investors; then leads the motivation of the workers so they turn their human capital and other factors into value for the shareholders.

Many years ago, I was told by two notably successful Asian-Ugandan businessmen that their fathers had taught them to always pay attention to speeches made by politicians – starting with the President – and daily news reports. The information they gleaned from those two sources, they explained separately, was their core business intelligence.

One of them told me his father had been raised with this knowledge and their family wealth had therefore weathered the Idi Amin Asian expulsion of the 1970s. Many years after I first heard these statements from them I attended an event launch at which one of them was unveiling a massive new investment and on the sidelines he revealed what had shown him that possibility.

“Every time the President makes a speech, I listen for clues…”

Exactly as happens whenever a CEO speaks – shareholders, investors, employees, business partners, suppliers, and other key stakeholders…they all stop and listen.

Especially at crucial points of the business cycle – at the end and start of the financial year, hence the State of the Nation address taking place just before the Budget speech; at the close of the calendar year; and when major business changes are taking place.

Reading the second tier newspaper across the border in Kenya a couple of weeks ago, I caught the headline, “Uhuru bets on four key sectors to boost growth’. The story outlined the “four pillars” the CEO of Kenya is focusing on: ‘Food Security, Affordable Housing, Manufacturing and Affordable Healthcare’.

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Stop right now and ask the next ten people you meet whether they can recite Uganda’s strategic priorities – it might be as frustrating as asking fifty people whether or not they know what our National Development Plan (II – not the first one) is.

Mind you, the idea here is not that we should have kept quiet and taken in everything said by the CEO without criticism and analysis, but maybe, just maybe, criticise and analyse after listening?

He spoke about many things: More sophisticated crime detection methods; illegal fishing; local content (Buy Uganda, Build Uganda); improved lake management; irrigation; innovations in solar power usage; import substitution (we annually import finished products worth US$7billion); the need for value addition to our raw materials within Uganda before exporting; more support for scientists; artisanship parks being built in Kampala…

The list is long and it contains many hints as to where the government will be placing its priorities next year – which should direct where the rest of us should place ours so we all push in the same direction and achieve “A Transformed Ugandan Society from a Peasant to a Modern and Prosperous Country within 30 years” – Uganda Vision 2040 as stated in the National Development Plan II.

In the corporate world, after the CEO has made those speeches and presentations, laying out the plans or strategies, the rest of the leadership translates these plans or strategies into departmental and personal plans and strategies so that over the year all staff focus on achieving the central goals and objectives.

After the speech over the weekend, though, do we remember what Uganda’s – OUR – goals and objectives for 2018 are; what the government that is running OUR affairs intends to do this year?

let’s identify and use our icons to promote Uganda more


THE first time I visited South Africa (the Republic) was in 1999, and the guys at the airport were still heady with the end end of apartheid – and to be frank, so was I.

Unlike myself, they couldn’t help bringing up Idi Amin when they read my Passport, even though I felt I deserved better as a Ugandan.

That entire visit I found that most people, including some random Zambian I met atop of Table Mountain, only linked the word “Uganda” to “Idi Amin” even though on interrogation I found that the Zambian HAD been to Uganda and met with serious Ugandans in the medical profession with no link whatsoever to our former President.

This is not about Idi Amin.

For about five years I found South Africans using different icons to relate to Uganda, but this week I was met by a Customs chap who responded to my being Ugandan (seeing the t-shirt) with, “Matooke! Did you bring Matooke?!”

The excitement of his exclamation could have been linked to the expectation that he would catch me bringing in this agricultural contraband and therefore earn some commission or bonus, but after I calmly denied he slapped my suitcase and smiled.

“Matooke tastes good, braa!”

I smiled and went along my merry way since it was late in the night, but the memory came back to me the next morning.

Through the years these icons have included enseenene (delicious tasting fried grasshoppers), which a number of South Africans find entertaining even though they and their cousins in Zimbabwe eat stuff like mopane worms; and Anne Kansiime who came up last year, proving the power and reach of our continental media.

“She’s a funny one, that one! Tell her I said hi!” said the Immigration chap that night.

At one point the icon they recognised most was our President, and I was relieved when instead of “Idi Amin!” they’d go, “Museveni!” This was about the time they seemed to learn about Uganda’s contribution to the apartheid struggle in the past.

Most Ugandans don’t know about this even now. I recall meeting some young South Africans back in my much younger days in some dark place in Kyambogo. A few hours in we realised they were complicated characters when they introduced knives into an equation that involved liquids of a potent nature.

The night ended without too much mayhem, and we didn’t become friends. Years later, I woke up in a dormitory somewhere and found myself face-to-face with one of those South Africans. He was back in the country to continue receiving the type of support that eventually led to these exclamations of “Museveni!” from his compatriots when I introduce myself as Ugandan.

When I was leaving South Africa the last guy at the security checkpoint asked me about David Obua. I smiled and we chatted briefly about this Ugandan.

This week’s declaration of “Matooke!” pleased me, and along the way I asked a few other South Africans about their knowledge or liking of the foodstuff – at least three of them confirmed it.

This is not about Matooke.

It is about icons – our national icons, and how much more we can do to identify and use them for diplomacy, tourism, investment and even our individual self-esteem. An ‘icon’ is “a person or thing regarded as a representative symbol or as worthy of veneration.”

The fact that we have positive sounds about ordinary things like enseenene and Matooke means we have lots more to offer the world than we realise or make use of.

Our Ambassadors and Tourism afficionados could keep us notified what these icons are so we take advantage of them at every turn and corner. If Matooke is the big thing from Uganda in South Africa in 2017 then every Ugandan flying down there could go with a recipe book and a sample packet of matooke crisps or something even more innovative, and sell more Uganda out there.

If.

urgent: a non-violent way of achieving REAL independence in Uganda, learning from India


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FIRST, go to your calendar and mark the day October 2, 2017. Then, set it to ‘Repeat’ annually.

Then read this: I received a phone call from a frustrated-sounding Renu Varun the other day, who introduced herself as “Goodwill Tourism Ambassador of Uganda to India”. Long story cut short, she insisted that we meet face to face and I acquiesced. I really do not like meetings.
She was bright and lovely from the start, but I still demanded firmly that she explain the words on her business card that read, ‘Obuntu Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam’. She told me ‘Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam‘ was the Indian equivalent of ‘Ubuntu’ – that oneness of humanity that we espouse over here, and they over there.
Her story was simple yet complicated.
When she arrived in Uganda in 2015 she was blown away by the people and the country and the spirit of peace. Within a couple of months, she had immersed herself into a project to get Uganda and India closer intertwined by way of increasing tourism from India to Uganda or, at least, by Indians in Uganda.
She was so amazed by the story of a young man called Victor Ochen, and the fact that he was a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, that she put two and two together and decided it would be most fitting for him to be celebrated at a ceremony held at the place where a world icon of peace had been laid to rest.
According to his wishes, Mahatma Gandhi, assassinated in 1948, had some of his ashes scattered at The Source of the Nile in Jinja. (Next year, we have the opportunity to mark 60 years of that event right HERE, but that’s a whole other discussion).
Renu, seeing the link between Gandhi, Ochen and Jinja, contacted the Gandhi family and they agreed to give Victor Ochen a tunic made off the very hand loom that Mahatma Gandhi himself used to make his own tunics off of.
Gandhi at the Loom
That tunic was airlifted to Uganda and, in a ceremony attended by the Indian Association of Uganda and officiated over by the Indian High Commissioner to Uganda then, given to Victor on October 2, 2015. Victor Ochen owns a tunic woven off the hand loom of Mahatma Gandhi, handed to him where Mahatma Gandhi’s remains were scattered. He is special.
Did you mark this date? It is October 2. That is the day, in 1869, on which Mahatma Gandhi was born. Because of that it is marked globally as the International Day of Non-Violence.
Monday October 2.001
After Victor received his tunic, Renu shared her big idea – Uganda needed to mark the ‘International Day of Non-Violence 2017’ in a grand way leading up to Independence Day celebrations, with hundreds of thousands of people in attendance at the Source of the Nile in Jinja. During the 2017 ceremonies, millions upon millions of people in India would tune in and pay attention to the event and Uganda, thus taking a further interest in tourism opportunities here.
See, in 2017 (she has been explaining to all and sundry since back in 2015) India would be marking 100 years of their Swadeshi Movement – the equivalent of what we are calling ‘Buy Uganda, Build Uganda’. Their Swadeshi Movement was a successful boycott of British products and establishment of Indian nationalism, industry and what Gandhi described as “the soul of Swaraj (self-rule)”.
How appropriate it would be, she argued, if on October 2, 2017 Uganda became the world’s home of the ‘International Day of Non-Violence’ celebrations and marked it at the Source of the Nile in Jinja by launching the ‘Buy Uganda, Build Uganda’ (did I hear Zimba Uganda?) Movement while marking 100 years of the Swadeshi Movement?
Very appropriate!
Swinging back to the Peace part of this, did you know that Uganda’s allocated SDG (Sustainable Development Goal) is Goal 16: “Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions”? Think about how all this ties in.
Not only that, Renu told me, Uganda’s special place in the minds of India is so deep-set that the cover photograph used on the Indian Government website of the India Africa Forum Summit in 2015 – the biggest held so far – bore a photograph of the Indian Foreign Affairs Minister shaking hands with only one African Foreign Affairs Minister – Uganda’s Sam Kutesa.
India Africa Summit Front Page
Meeting a very high ranking Indian government official in India one day, she said to him, “We talk about Gandhism every day here in India, but in Uganda they live Gandhism!”
Did you mark the date, by the way? It’s October 2, 2017 – at the Source of the Nile in Jinja.
By the time our coffee was done, I still didn’t know the theme of this year’s Independence Day celebrations or whether Ugandans would be wearing foreign-made suits and ties to celebrate ‘Independence’. Also, there was no confirmation of a government-sponsored or organised event at the Source of the Nile in Jinja on October 2, 2017.


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I have heard, though, that His Royal Highness the Aga Khan will be a Guestof Honour at this year’s Independence Day celebrations. Why is this significant?
At some point in his life, Mahatma Gandhi was imprisoned in the Aga Kahn Palace in Pune, in India. After launching the ‘Quit India’ Movement in 1942. Read some of the story for yourself, off the plaque at the Palace itself:
Aga Khan Gandhi Plaque
Seriously, Uganda, all the elements are coming together so well that we don’t have to wait for another announcement, as peace-loving, tourism-propelled Ugandans who are lauded the world over for being a haven of peace in the Great Lakes Region and the world’s shining example of refugee handling and regional conflict resolution.
This is not for the Government of Uganda to hire tents and public address systems and then prepare speeches by a Guest of Honour. All of us can go out there and talk Peace and Security and Buy Uganda Build Uganda/Zimba Uganda.
Renu had an interesting idea: If the Parliament of Uganda declared that for that week all MPs were required to dress up strictly in traditional garb or clothing made in Uganda, surely a message would be sent. Perhaps some of them might wake up on the eighth day and feel like NOT going back to clothes made in China, Turkey and Bangladesh?
What about in our own private companies? Can WE not do the same for that one week?
Starting on:
Monday October 2.001
October 2, 2017 – International Day of Non-Violence at the Source of the River Nile, all decked out in Ugandan made clothing, eating Ugandan food and picking up from 100 years of Swadeshi to make Buy Uganda Build Uganda (Zimba Uganda) a success that will make INDEPENDENCE on October 9 much, much more meaningful!
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