designing the link between our university education and the real world


LAST week I received this electronic flyer (above) for the Makerere University Endowment Fund Run set for Sunday, May 14, 2017. That flyer didn’t make me lace up my running shoes or unfurl my thin wallet.

Instead, I checked carefully to make sure that this wasn’t a flyer from 1999 as its two-dimensional presentation was very dated and, to me, uninspiring. I do not mean to put down the person who designed it, because they were probably doing their best in circumstances I neither know nor can describe.

My disappointment was that the University, the seat of higher learning ranked number four on the continent of Africa, could produce work of this quality. Again – the work was not terrible, but it was a clear sign that the potential of the students of higher learning at this university was being wasted.

A few years ago one of my kid brothers, Paul, ranted about the education format at the university, and this flyer reminded me of that rant with some pain.

See, the Universities ideally take up the best brains from secondary schools countrywide and then give them a platform to develop their knowledge and demonstrate it in various ways even as they learn.

My brother’s rant was to do with the Engineering department. He outlined what he felt should be the system: when a student joins the university Engineering or technology department they should pick a project within their first year that they will do over the duration of their course.

The projects the students would be encouraged to choose, he said, would be projects that could be applicably put to real-life use. At the end of their four-year course, the students should leave the university with their projects and, as much as possible, deploy them in real-life.

That approach, he said, would have the Engineering lecturers spend more time supervising students closely and using their vast knowledge to nurture and develop the intelligence, curiosity and innovative capacity of the students.

When I was at the Makerere University we had a newspaper called The Makererean that students of journalism were expected to produce as part of our hands-on experience and learning.

I even edited it – or carried the title ‘Editor’ even though we didn’t produce more than two editions of it for “budgetary” reasons. I once got involved in a short discussion about diverting faculty allowances (given to individual students) to producing this newspapers, but it was a very short discussion.

The Agriculture students at the university should be producing food crops, not necessarily by digging it up using hoes, but producing them anyway; leading up to the School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bio-Engineering which would develop or package that produce and send it straight to the market.

The story should go on and on in that way.

Coming back to the Flyer that disturbed me last week, I figured that Makerere University offers (that’s what we say) courses in Economics, Business, Computing and Information Science, Fine Art, Visual Communication, Design and Multimedia, Industrial Art and Applied Design, Liberal and Performing Arts and Film, Languages, Literature and Communication, Journalism and Communication… the list is long.

Any and every one of these departments should have students that can be made to apply themselves to simple tasks such as designing flyers and advertisements, that would count towards their learning experiences and build their portfolios for the future.

If all projects at the University gave these students the opportunity to apply their design skills, then there would be thousands, if not tens of thousands, of entries of various designs. This free platform that the University can give to the students to apply themselves is invaluable, and would make a massive difference to their entry into the real world.

Many of the people that we employ in design and creative firms actually come from this same university and do a superb job, in instances.

While thinking this through I went by the Makerere University website (www.mak.ac.ug) and got to a page that had a snazzy countdown to the Endowment Fund Run, which was impressive – at least THAT was being done right, but still didn’t work well enough to make me tie up my shoe laces or unfurl my thin wallet to contribute to the cause.

It did, however, make me feel like contributing to a strategy that will harness these bright, hopeful minds at the University so that their potential is converted!

One thought on “designing the link between our university education and the real world

  1. On a positive note, I am proud of the College of Agricultural Sciences and how it has transformed. In our time (mid 90s), the best we did was dig gardens, look after swine and plant crops. Today, they have diversified and Value Addition is a key component. I in a way wish I could get younger and pursue a degree once again.

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